Homages & Influences – COWBOY BEBOP

https://www.rfblues.com/Omake/Influences/

Session #1 – Asteroid Blues

MUSICIAN: ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM
Character Name Homage: Senile Old Men
FILM: DESPERADO
Character Design Influence: Asimov & Katerina
Scene Influence: Bar shoot-out
FILM: BONNIE & CLYDE
Scene Influence: Asimov & Katerina’s last stand

Session #2 – Stray Dog Strut

SONG: STRAY CAT STRUT
Title Homage
PUPPET SHOW: PUNCH AND JUDY
Character Name Homage & Design Influence: Big Shot Hosts
Way Of The Dragon
FILM: WAY OF THE DRAGON
Referenced In Dialogue
FILM: GAME OF DEATH
Scene Influence: Spike VS Hakim

Session #3 – Honky Tonk Woman

SONG: HONKY TONK WOMAN
Title Homage
FILM: POKER ALICE
Referenced In Dialogue
ALBUM: ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Location Name Homage: Casino is named Spiders From Mars
MUSICIAN: CHARLIE PARKER
Referenced In Dialogue

Session #5 – Ballad Of Fallen Angels

SONG: FALLEN ANGELS
Title Homage
LANDMARK: NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL
Location Influence
FILM: THE KILLER
Scene Influence: Church shoot-out
FILM: THE CROW
Scene Influence: The fall of Spike

Session #6 – Sympathy For The Devil

SONG: SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL
Title Homage

Session #7 – Heavy Metal Queen

MYTHOLOGY: TERPSICHORE THE MUSE
Character Name Homage: VT (Victoria Terpsichore)
ACTOR: WOODY ALLEN
Location Name Homage: Woody’s Ice Cream Parlor
Character Design Influence: Decker

Session #8 – Waltz For Venus

COMIC BOOK CHARACTERS: HUEY, DEWY AND LOUIE
Character Name Homage: Shuttle Hijackers
FILM: ENTER THE DRAGON
Scene Influence: Spike’s kung-fu lesson

Session #9 – Jamming With Edward

ALBUM: JAMMING WITH EDWARD
Title Homage
FILM CHARACTER: HAL (FROM 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY)
Character Design Influence: MPU
Celebrity: Uri Gellar
Character Name Homage: Uri Kellerman

Session #10 – Ganymede Elegy

TELEVISION CHARACTERS: BAKER AND PONCH (From CHiPs)
Character Design Influence: Baker Ponchorero

Session #11 – Toys In The Attic

SONG: TOYS IN THE ATTIC
Title Homage
MOVIE: ALIEN
Plot Influence

Session #14 – Bohemian Rhapsody

SONG: BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY
Title Homage

Session #15 – My Funny Valentine

SONG: MY FUNNY VALENTINE
Title Homage
Referenced In Dialogue
USS Enterprise NCC-1701-B
FILM: USS ENTERPRISE NCC-1701-B
Subtle Homage: A cryo-chamber shares the same number
MYTHOLOGY: BACCHUS THE GOD OF WINE
Character Name Homage: Doctor Baccus
Referenced In Dialogue
FAIRY TALE: SLEEPING BEAUTY
Referenced In Dialogue
Closing Sentence Homage
FAIRY TALE: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Closing Line Homage

Session #16 – Black Dog Serenade

FILM: CON AIR
Plot Influence

Session #17 – Mushroom Samba

SONG: WATERMELON MAN
Character Design Influence: Mellon Man
FILM: COFFY
Character Name Homage/Design Influence: Coffee
FILM: SHAFT
Character Name Homage/Design Influence: Shaft
FILM: DJANGO
Character Design Influence: Shaft, coffin dragging
SONG: STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN
Referenced In Dialogue

Session #18 – Speak Like A Child

SONG: SPEAK LIKE A CHILD
Title Homage
FOLKTALE: URASHIMA TARO
Referenced In Dialogue
FAIRY TALE: THE TORTOISE AND THE HARE
Subtle Homage: Carrier company mascots
TELEVISION: BEVERLY HILLS 90210
Scene Influence: Video Expert watches a similar show

Session #19 – Wild Horses

SONG: WILD HORSES
Title Homage
LEGEND: BABE RUTH (GEORGE HERMAN RUTH)
Character Name Homage: Starship Pirates
ACTOR: JAMES DOOHAN
Character Name Homage: Doohan
TELEVISION CHARACTER: MILES O’BRIEN (FROM STAR TREK)
Character Name Homage: Miles
TELEVISION CHARACTER: REG BARCLAY (FROM STAR TREK)
Character Name Homage: Reg the parts dealer
FILM: STAR TREK: FIRST CONTACT
Plot Influence
SPACE SHUTTLE: COLUMBIA
Scene Influence: Used to rescue Spike from Earth’s atmosphere

Session #20 – Pierrot Le Fou

FILM: PIERROT LE FOU
Title Homage
Character Name Homage: Tongpu (Mad Pierrot)
COMIC BOOK CHARACTERS: THE JOKER AND THE PENGUIN
Character Design Influence: Tongpu (Mad Pierrot)
SONG: ON THE RUN
Scene Influence: Tongpu’s origin

Session #21 – Boogie-Woogie Feng-Shui

FILM: THE BLUES BROTHERS
Character Design Influence: Blue Snake Mobsters

Session #22 – Cowboy Funk

CRIMINAL: THEODORE “TEDDY” KACZYNSKI (UNABOMBER)
Character Design Influence: Ted Bower (Teddy Bomber, TB)
PICTURE BOOK: COWBOY ANDY
Character Design Influence: Andy Von De Oniyate
Referenced In Dialogue
LEGEND: MUSASHI MIYAMOTO
Character Design Influence: Musashi The Bounty Hunter (Andy)
Referenced In Dialogue

Session #23 – Brain Scratch

CRIMINAL: MARSHALL APPLEWHITE
Character Design Influence: Doctor Londes
CULT: HEAVEN’S GATE
Plot Influence
VIDEOGAME CHARACTER: LARA CROFT
Subtle Homage: Similar-looking standee in toy store

Session #24 – Hard Luck Woman

SONG: HARD LUCK WOMAN
Title Homage
FILM: COOL HAND LUKE
Scene Influence: The eating of the eggs

Session #25 – The Real Folk Blues (Part I)

ALBUM: THE REAL FOLK BLUES
Title Homage
SHORT STORY: SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO
Referenced In Dialogue

Session #26 – The Real Folk Blues (Part II)

FOLKTALE: HYAKUMANKAI IKITA NEKO
Referenced In Dialogue
FILM: A BETTER TOMORROW II
Scene Influence: The storming of the Red Dragon Headquarters
SONG: CARRY THAT WEIGHT
Closing Line Homage

Session XX – Mish-Mash Blues

SONG: QUE SERA SERA
Segment Title Homage
SONG: WALK THIS WAY
Segment Title Homage
SONG: YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT
Segment Title Homage
MUSICIAN: ARETHA FRANKLIN
Segment Title Homages
SONG: INSTANT KARMA
Segment Title Homage
SONG: SUGAR MOUNTAIN
Segment Title Homage
SONG: IF SIX WAS NINE
Segment Title Homage
SONG: MY FAVORITE THINGS
Segment Title Homage
SONG: UNFINISHED SYMPATHY
Segment Title Homage
SONG: WHOLE LOTTA LOVE
Segment Title Homage
SONG: DAYDREAM BELIEVER
Segment Title Homage
FILM: LOOK BACK IN ANGER
Segment Title Homage
SONG: IT’S ALL OVER NOW, BABY BLUE
Segment Title Homage

The Movie – Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door

SONG: KNOCKIN’ ON HEAVEN’S DOOR
Title Homage
VIDEOGAME: RALLY X
Subtle Homage: Lee Samson plays a similar game
FILM: DIRTY HARRY
Character Design Homage: Spike
FILM: CAPRICORN ONE
Scene Influence: Biplanes rescue mission

Near Burrard station in Downtown Vancouver. Summer of 2018.

Burrard is an underground station on the Expo Line of Metro Vancouver’s SkyTrain rapid transit system. The station is located in Downtown Vancouver on Burrard Street, where Melville and Dunsmuir Streets meet, and is the western terminus of the R5 Hastings St that provides service to Simon Fraser University.

The station serves Vancouver’s financial district and is within walking distance of the Coal Harbour and West End neighbourhoods. The station is accessible via the surface from Art Phillips Park or via the underground shopping centres of the Royal Centre and Bentall Centre skyscraper complexes.

Burrard station opened in 1985 and is named for nearby Burrard Street, which in turn is named for Sir Harry Burrard-Neale. Prior to the opening of the Canada Line in 2009, Burrard station was the northern terminus of the 98 B-Line and was served by a number of bus routes that provided service to Vancouver’s southern suburbs of Delta, Richmond, Surrey, and White Rock. In 2016, bus service to the eastern suburbs of the Tri-Cities was discontinued when the Millennium Line’s Evergreen Extension opened.

In May 2018, preliminary plans were revealed to renovate and expand Burrard station. On July 13, 2021, TransLink announced that it would close the station for two years beginning in early 2022 to allow construction for the rebuild.

The structure housing the surface station entrance was designed to resemble Victorian-era British railway stations, with a peaked glass roof. The station was designed by the Austrian architecture firm Architektengruppe U-Bahn.

When originally opened, the station’s only underground passage was to the Bentall Centre skyscraper complex. A connection to the Royal Centre complex was constructed some years later, while an anticipated underground passage to the Park Place skyscraper across the street was never built. The construction of a new east entrance to the station, at the southeast corner of the intersection of Burrard and Dunsmuir, was considered as part of upgrades to the station included in TransLink’s 10-Year Vision, but the cost of such an addition was higher than expected and TransLink turned to reviewing options to improve the existing entrance.

Like Granville, the station was built inside the Dunsmuir Tunnel and has a distinctive platform design. The inbound track (to Waterfront) is stacked on top of the outbound track (to King George and Production Way–University), with the inbound platform being one level above the outbound platform.

Burrard station is one of four SkyTrain stations on the Expo Line that serve Downtown Vancouver. It has connections with many TransLink bus routes in Metro Vancouver; these buses serve the city of Vancouver, Burnaby, the city and district of North Vancouver, and West Vancouver.

Kids Have Fallen Into Gorilla Enclosures In The Past But With Different Endings

Before the Cincinnati Zoo tragedy involving a little boy and a giant gorilla, there have been other, similar encounters that ended without the primate being shot to death. In 1986, a 5-year-old boy named Levan Merritt fell into a gorilla enclosure and was knocked unconscious. A silverback gorilla named Jambo stroked the boy’s back as if to soothe him. In 1996, a 3-year-old boy tumbled more than 20 feet into the gorilla exhibit. She placed him near the cage’s door and stepped back as zookeepers picked up the child.

15 Best Books From the Defunct ‘Star Wars’ Expanded Universe

https://www.thewrap.com/the-best-books-from-the-defunct-star-wars-expanded-universe-photos/

Even though we’re in a new era of ”Star Wars,“ it’s always good to look back at where we’ve been in the long history of ”Star Wars“ novels. After Disney bought LucasFilm and got the ball rolling on new “Star Wars” movies, they wiped clean the entire Expanded Universe of narratively connected novels, comics and video games from the official “Star Wars” timeline. Gone, yes, but not forgotten. Among all the novels that were published over three decades, there’s still plenty of gems to be found in the defunct Expanded Universe.

  1. “Tales From Jabba’s Palace” (1996)

The “Star Wars” universe, being massive and full of oddities, was really well served by a series of short story anthologies like this, which also happens to be the best one. It explores a lot of the strange things we saw in Jabba’s palace in “Return of the Jedi,” and it’s never afraid to get real weird — which in this case, at least, is a great thing.

  1. “Outbound Flight” (2006)

Functions as a prequel to Timothy Zahn’s Thrawn trilogy, finally detailing the Outbound Flight mission we’d heard mentioned so many times for over a decade — and it turned out to be a lot more involved than we’d thought. “Outbound Flight,” which occurred during the events of the prequel trilogy, involved a group of Jedi Masters and a number of colonists taking an expedition beyond the galaxy in search of extra-galactic Force users — but on their way out they flew through the Unknown Regions of the galaxy, and ran afoul of some of the more unsavory alien civilizations there. And also Thrawn, whose species of blue near-humans hails from that part of space.

  1. “Edge of Victory: Conquest” (2001)

Late in the run of the Expanded Universe came single longform stories published as a series — the longest of these was the “New Jedi Order,” about a race of religious fanatic aliens called the Yuuzhan Vong invading the galaxy. “Conquest” was the eighth in that series, and it was the first, ah, humanizing look at the Yuuzhan Vong society. It turned out that, like any other society, the Yuuzhan Vong has its downtrodden folks who don’t like the murderous establishment, and teenage Anakin (youngest son of Han and Leia) carries out a dangerous mission with one such downtrodden soul.

  1. “Isard’s Revenge” (1999)

This “X-Wing” one-shot novel is essentially the payoff to the entire long history of the elite Rogue Squadron that was told over a number of novels and comic books. Every loose end tied off and many stories, including some not part of the Rogue arc, re-contextualized in a really interesting way. “Isard’s Revenge” is the kind of story that can only happen within a massive universe with a detailed history — it’s the kind of story that makes a lot of old bad storytelling feel like it was worth it.

  1. “Han Solo and the Lost Legacy” (1980)

One of the most fascinating aspects of the “Star Wars” Expanded Universe was how the early authors were kinda making up how everything worked and casually establishing hugely important things. Though, it was obvious nobody knew what they were doing and most of the books were pretty terrible as details were filled in at random. The three “Han Solo Adventures” were released in 1979 and 1980 — and they work because they tell small stories rather than the sort of galaxy-shaking narratives we would see every couple months throughout the ’90s. “Lost Legacy,” the third one, sees Han going after the fabled treasure of Xim the Despot at the edge of the galaxy. It’s a great story, and an early emblem for the flexibility of “Star Wars” as a setting.

  1. “Hand of Thrawn” duology (1997)

Grand Admiral Thrawn has been dead for a decade, and the New Republic is on the verge of an official peace accord with the beaten-down remnants of the Empire. But Thrawn’s legacy, and plans he’d set in motion long before threaten that peace. This is why nerds love Thrawn so much. In the Expanded Universe, he casts a shadow that — though it’s a different kind of shadow — is nearly as long as that of Darth Vader and the Emperor.

  1. “Wedge’s Gamble” (1996)

The second book in the “X-Wing” series recounts the Liberation of Coruscant by the New Republic a few years after “Return of the Jedi.” It’s a seemingly impossible task — the Empire is still extremely well armed, and Corsucant is protected by an impenetrable energy shield. So they clandestinely send in the new Rogue Squadron, which had been rebuilt with squad members had a number of other martial skills beyond being great pilots. The Rogues are tasked with bringing down the planetary shield by whatever means possible, and as they’re on a deadline, this thing gets hairy as hell.

  1. “Dark Force Rising” (1993)

I don’t hold up Timothy Zahn’s Thrawn trilogy with the sort of reverence a lot of fans do, but the middle book, “Dark Force Rising,” is really great. Grand Admiral Thrawn has reunited much of the remains of the Empire and is ripping the New Republic a new one. Then a wild card enters the fray: the mythical Katana Fleet, 200 massive droid-controlled dreadnoughts that had disappeared from known space due to a computer error during the Clone Wars decades earlier. By chance it’s been found, and it’s a race to see which side can claim them first — because the Katana fleet would seriously tilt the balance of the war.

  1. “Enemy Lines” duology (2002)

Late in the “New Jedi Order,” famed Rebel hero Wedge Antilles is charged with holding the planet Borleias from the Yuuzhan Vong, and it’s one hell of a thing. Massively outgunned, Wedge pulls a whole lot of seat-of-your-pants gambits out of his ass — and this pair of books, authored by the late Aaron Allston, is full of great and witty dialogue of the sort you just never got from other “Star Wars” authors. I treat “Enemy Lines” as a singular entity because the two sort of function as a single book split in half.

  1. “Cloak of Deception” (2001)

During the years when the prequel trilogy was released, a lot of novels and comics were commissioned more or less just to clean up the many narrative problems with those films. In “The Phantom Menace,” for example, fans complain about all the talk of trade routes and taxes — but the real problem was just that we didn’t understand what any of it meant just from the movie. Enter “Cloak of Deception,” which gave the Trade Federation’s beef with the Republic exactly the context it needed and by extension improving that bad movie in a real way.

  1. “Wraith Squadron” (1998)

The story of the Wraiths is unique among “Star Wars” stories in a lot of ways. It follows famed Rebel pilot Wedge Antilles as he assembles a hybrid starfighter/foot soldier squadron of emotionally unstable washouts — in hopes that such a group might approach apparently normal war scenarios in really unpredictable ways, and that’s exactly what happens. It’s the most human of all the “Star Wars” stories, full of truth.

  1. “Revenge of the Sith” (2005)

In a stroke of brilliance, LucasFilm had one of its best “Star Wars” authors, Matthew Woodring Stover, write the novelization of “Revenge of the Sith.” It’s so good it might trick you into remembering fondly the awful movie on which it’s based. It’s also notable as a film novelization because it leans heavily on the Expanded Universe, with other books being referenced heavily. And that’s why it qualifies for this list — a lot of stuff here isn’t part of the canon anymore.

  1. “Starfighters of Adumar” (1999)

The late Aaron Allston authored many of the best Expanded Universe stories, and “Starfighters of Adumar” is where really got to cut loose. Wedge Antilles and pals Tycho, Hobbie and Janson, are sent as diplomats to a newly discovered planet full of people who pretty don’t give a shit about anyone who isn’t a fighter pilot. It’s incessantly funny and weird — a great little side story that’s as witty as they get in this universe.

  1. “Iron Fist” (1998)

The Wraiths, now a unit with some missions under their belts, go undercover as a mercenary pirate gang in hopes of being hired by the biggest Imperial threat at that time, the Warlord Zsinj. It’s harrowing as hell, and an escalation of the themes established in “Wraith Squadron,” as the group struggles (and often fails) to keep it together mentally.

  1. “Traitor” (2002)

The peak of the “New Jedi Order,” and where the purpose of its overall narrative arc was revealed. In the ’90s, the “Star Wars” Expanded Universe got really moralistic and stuffy, and “Traitor” was a total refutation of that approach. It’s the darkest “Star Wars” story ever written, but it serves a positive agenda in the end: Maybe the Force isn’t black and white and the Jedi don’t need to stand around wondering about the moral implications of every little thing they do. It was a really great change for storytelling in the “Star Wars” universe.

Remembering Charlie’s Music City on Granville Street

The days of when one could post just about any video on YouTube are long gone. Nowadays, even an inclusion of certain pictures in a video can get one a copyright claim on YouTube. And YouTube itself has pretty much turned into American television, with the mind-numbing shows and propaganda that one can expect from American television. YouTube is now a website where the only people that can get any serious exposure are people that work for Western media companies, influencers, and propagandists. Naturally, these are also the people that can earn plenty of money on YouTube because of advertising. The people that aren’t influencers or propagandists, such as myself, don’t get to have exposure on YouTube nowadays and they don’t get to earn money because of advertising. Anyway, it seems that I’m already going off topic. Why am I mentioning this? Well, firstly, I’m mentioning this because I’m old enough to remember when things were different on YouTube, though they didn’t stay different for long. Secondly, I’m mentioning this because, recently, the Bubblegum Crisis soundtracks that I uploaded in 2014 got copyright claimed and taken down on YouTube by Universal Music Japan. Years ago, it was possible to upload anime films and series on YouTube without any problems. But now even obscure anime soundtracks and music get copyright claims. Although the eight Bubblegum Crisis soundtracks that I uploaded aren’t widely available, they’re still some of the best anime soundtracks out there. At least my channel didn’t get terminated because of these copyright claims. It seems that the soundtracks got taken down because UMJ recently made them available for purchase online. They’re even available as vinyl records on a website like Amazon now. So, it seems that UMJ has wasted no time in eliminating any of the Bubblegum Crisis music that’s available for free online. Good for UMJ. It’s actually not a bad thing that these good anime soundtracks are now available for purchase. But this doesn’t mean that I have to like that my videos got taken down. Before they got taken down, these videos accumulated many thousands of views and had comments from people that speak English and Japanese. Therefore, I’m not going to buy anything from UMJ anymore. I certainly don’t have to buy the Bubblegum Crisis soundtracks, which have cool covers, because I already have them. Fortunately, the Bubblegum Crash soundtracks and the AD Police Files soundtracks that I uploaded are still available on my channel. The other good anime soundtracks that I have in my collection are Ah! My Goddess, Cowboy Bebop, Aura Battler Dunbine, Castle In The Sky, Digimon: The Movie, Dirty Pair: Project Eden, Ghost In The Shell, Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Grave Of The Fireflies, Gunnm, Howl’s Moving Castle, Akira, Innocence, Saber Marionette J, Neon Genesis Evangelion, Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade, Key The Metal Idol, Macross Plus, Mobile Suit Gundam: Char’s Counterattack, Mobile Suit Gundam 0083: Stardust Memory, Nausicaa Of The Valley Of The Wind, Paprika, Pokemon: The First Movie, Princess Mononoke, Rurouni Kenshin, Sailor Moon, Mobile Suit Gundam Wing, Spirited Away, Venus Wars, The Vision Of Escaflowne, When Marnie Was There, Kiki’s Delivery Service, and Whisper Of The Heart. These are all of the anime soundtracks that I’ve collected over the years so far. But, of course, it hasn’t been that long since I got into buying anime soundtracks. I began to buy and obtain anime films and series only after I graduated from high school. Before that, I gave almost no thought to having an anime collection, and I still don’t have a big anime collection because I buy only the best anime. I am from a poor family, after all. Sure, I’ve been working, and also volunteering, since I was in the 10th grade, but, for some reason, the idea of buying anime, or simply buying discs and other media, didn’t enter my mind before I graduated. I think that one of the reasons for this is because I grew up in a Russian family. In this family, there was always the possibility that almost anything that I bought would be taken away by my parents if they didn’t like it or if they thought that it’s interfering with my schoolwork. I think that the only things that were safe from their outrage were books, and not even all books. My parents are typical Russian barbarians, and, after having to deal with them and with other Russians, I don’t want to to deal with Russians ever again. I later realized that this sadism, this disrespect for individual rights, for private property, and for individual comforts is actually a part of Russian culture. This is also one of the reasons why some Russians don’t like Russian culture and don’t like their country. Well, I suppose that there’s a reason why some Russians call their country a nation of idiots. I’d say that it’s not only a nation of idiots. It’s also a nation of traitors and of irresponsible people. I speak from experience and from years of observation when I say this. The only thing that Russians can do well is screw up. By the way, in this nation of idiots, the rich are notorious for showing off their wealth and their status to those that are less fortunate than them. This was the case before the October Revolution of 1917 and this is the case now. Russian oligarchs, the people that are hated by many people in Russia, are notorious for showing off the stuff, such as their big yachts, that they purchased abroad. In the West, rich people usually hide their wealth and they don’t flaunt it. In Russia, it’s the opposite. The rich in Russia love flaunting their wealth and they despise poor people. Well, what else can you expect in a banana republic such as Russia? By the way, I’m surprised that a McDonald’s restaurant hasn’t yet opened in Saint Basil’s Cathedral. I mean, a foreign burger joint has opened in just about every other historical Russian or Soviet building in Moscow since 1991. And huge advertisements for women’s underwear featuring semi-naked young women hang on the sides of historical 19th century buildings in Moscow. So, why hasn’t a burger joint opened yet in Saint Basil’s Cathedral or in the Kremlin? Am I supposed to believe that even the idiotic Russians have a limit to where one can place advertisements and “business” signs? Maybe the idea hasn’t yet entered their minds. I mean, Russians are known for not only being idiotic but also for being dumb. Recent research shows that Russians may be as intelligent as some of the big apes. Russians are certainly not as intelligent as homo sapiens. I can only imagine how difficult it must have been for Bill Clinton to dictate commands to the ape named Boris Yeltsin. In a normal country, someone like Yeltsin is usually kept in a zoo or in the wild. But, in Russia, Yeltsin was the head of the government. Research about the miserable intelligence of Russians goes all the way back to the 19th century, when the British scholar and explorer Sir Aston Martin Bentley the 11th traveled to Russia and then wrote a book, ‘Russians in their Natural Environment’, after observing them. And don’t even get me started on the fiction that the Russians defeated Nazi Germany. It is technically impossible for a nation of idiots and traitors such as Russia to defeat Nazi Germany. Why is this fiction still in the history books? It is a fact that Russians would sell out their country for a banana. Am I supposed to believe that the Germans couldn’t afford bananas? Didn’t the Germans build rockets? Surely they could have acquired some bananas in order to give to the Russians during Operation Barbarossa. Did they forget? It seems that I’m going off topic again. Let’s get back to my anime collection. When I was in my mid-teens and late-teens, I began to go to some of the stores in the center of the city that sold DVDs, CDs, and VHS tapes. These trips to the center of the city were rare for me back then, but they were quite enjoyable and memorable because stores that sold DVDs, CDs and video games still existed back then in decent numbers. Although I didn’t buy anything, or couldn’t buy anything, I still walked around and looked at the things that were available for sale. The DVD covers and the VHS covers usually had large pictures or stills on the back, and I enjoyed looking at them and also reading whatever was written on them. They weren’t like the bland and small Blu-ray covers or video game covers that are available now. One used DVD and CD store that I liked in particular was called Charlie’s Music City. The owner was probably an Iranian man in his late-fifties or early-sixties, but I don’t know anything about him because I never spoke to him. He had several people, usually young women, working for him at the store. The store was located near the intersection of Granville Street and Robson Street. Granville Street is also the street where my favorite movie theatre, Empire Granville 7 Cinemas, was located. The reason why I liked Charlie’s Music City is because it was a big store. Some people claim that it was the biggest used DVD and CD store in Canada. It wasn’t huge, but there was still a lot to see there. There were rows and rows of shelves stacked with used DVDs, CDs, and VHS tapes. Video games were sold there too, but they were located at the counters, in glass cases. In addition to the video games, video game consoles were sold there. There were various consoles for sale, and the ones that were most visible were consoles like the GameCube, the PlayStation 2, the Xbox, the Nintendo 64, and the Dreamcast. They were placed on the shelves behind the counters or they hung in transparent plastic bags on the wall there. DVD players, VHS players, and various electronic equipment and parts were also sold there. When I went to this store, I usually spent most of the time looking at DVDs and VHS tapes. The counters of the store were well lit, but some of the DVDs were on the shelves in the dimly lit corners of the store. I could walk around for as long as an hour or more and look at what was available because there was so much to see. Notably, I looked at the anime, straight-to-video films, foreign films, and old films that caught my eye. My favorites were the VHS covers for Key The Metal Idol, Lupin III’s Greatest Capers, Neon Genesis Evangelion, Gasaraki, and RahXephon. For example, the VHS covers that were made by A.D. Vision for Neon Genesis Evangelion can be viewed here: http://svenge.evamonkey.com/evasite/usvhs/usvhs.htm. I also liked to look at the DVD covers for 1980s and 1990s popular and obscure action films, horror films, and science-fiction films. So, not long after I graduated from high school, I finally decided to buy my first DVDs. Unfortunately, soon after I bought my first DVDs, Charlie’s Music City, like many other DVD and CD stores, closed for good, at the very beginning of 2011. The closure of this store and the closure of Empire Granville 7 Cinemas in 2012 was like the end of an era for me. I still feel a little sad when I think about how fast these places closed down. Of course, DVDs weren’t the only things that I bought at Charlie’s Music City. I bought some CDs because there were many CDs for sale there too. However, I sold or gave away my small collection of CDs not long after that because I decided to keep all of my music in MP3 format. But, last year, I began buying CDs again in order to have all of the albums from Time magazine’s All-Time 100 Albums list in CD format. Time magazine’s list is my favorite music list. I’ve been buying about one CD per month so far, and I’ve acquired 19 albums from the list of the 100 albums already. Used CDs aren’t expensive now. They can usually be bought for about ten dollars or less. Another place that I kind of liked on Granville Street was a small pizza restaurant, though I liked it not because it was a restaurant but because it had an arcade cabinet in the back on which one could play Soul Edge. When I first came to this pizza joint, a young man was already playing Soul Edge. He was so impressed by the music of this fighting game and by the game itself that he couldn’t contain his excitement. He noticed that I was standing not far from him and that I was looking at him play. Therefore, after he finished playing and after he uttered a few more praises, he walked away in order to let me play it. And, if I remember correctly, playing this game was free of charge. Anyway, the first DVDs that I bought were for Neon Genesis Evangelion, The Guyver: Bio-Booster Armor, Macross Plus, and RahXephon. Before that, when I was a teenager, I either checked out films at my local library or I rented them at DVD rental stores. Some of the anime was distributed by Manga Entertainment at that time. My DVDs featured not only special features but also trailers. I not only enjoyed looking at the covers but also watching the trailers for Perfect Blue, Ghost In The Shell, Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust, Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie, Ninja Scroll, Blood: The Last Vampire, Patlabor: The Movie, Patlabor 2: The Movie, and other releases. These old trailers from the early-2000s and the mid-2000s are still etched in my mind and I still enjoy watching them. Nowadays, they can be found on YouTube. Things sure were different when I bought my first DVDs. I still associate that time with the institute that I attended after graduating, with the Vancouver rain that poured in the autumn and the winter of that year, and with Granville Street because I went there the most after graduating from high school. Back then, the anime industry hadn’t yet turned into the industry that makes bland, unoriginal, cute, and poorly animated shows and films that it is today. It was already in the process of turning into this institutionalized and artistically bankrupt industry, kind of like Hollywood, but it wasn’t quite there yet. Good and edgy films and shows were still being made, though they were already rare. Nothing like Neon Genesis Evangelion, Cowboy Bebop, or even Fruits Basket can be made today. Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood is one of my favorite anime shows, but it was made before the 2010s, the story is taken from a manga, and its animation is nothing to speak of. Now that I think about, the anime that I bought or watched right after graduating from high school brought me almost as much gladness and excitement as Pokemon did in my childhood. I’ve never been obsessed with anime, not even in my teens and early-twenties. Well, I did have something of an obsession with Neon Genesis Evangelion when I found out about it in the 9th grade. Perhaps this is the reason why this show is the first one that I bought on DVD, and I had never seen it before I bought it. So, I had to wait for years before I even got to see Neon Genesis Evangelion. I can’t, for example, relate to the otaku in Japan at all. Some of these people have stacks of anime, manga, comics, video games, and action figures in their homes. But I sure do like to watch anime from time to time, though the anime that I watch is the original and quality anime that was made before the 2000s. Heck, even OVAs like Angel Cop or New Cutie Honey now seem great if they’re compared to what gets made now. Anyway, I was actually planning to make a post about the soundtracks of the horror films, neo-noir films, and teen films that I enjoy watching and that I recommend. I’ve already made several videos listing these films, though I haven’t posted all of them on my blog yet. What I wanted to point out is that it’s not only these films from the 1970s to the 1990s that are worth watching. Their soundtracks are worth getting as well. I also wanted to list my favorite anime because this is what a few followers wanted me to do. But, somehow, I got carried away and made a post about something else. Next time then.